GEM PhD School

Globalisation, Europe & Multilateralism

Erasmus Mundus Joint Doctorate

Academic Degrees & Titles

Edward Page is Associate Professor in Political Theory. Dr Page is a member of  Warwick's Low Carbon Society Initiative and the Centre for Law, Philosophy and Public Affairs, as well as co-organiser of Warwick's Annual Graduate Conference in Political Theory.

Ed studied politics and philosophy at the University of Sheffield (1987-91) and Essex University (1991-92) before undertaking doctoral research on the problem of justice between generations at Warwick University (1994-98). He has held several teaching and research posts at universities in the UK and overseas including Southampton, Keele, Lund and Birmingham. He returned to Warwick in September 2006. 

Between 2002 and 2004 he was a Marie Curie Research Fellow at Lund University's Department of Political Science where he pursued research funded by the European Commission on the implications of global climate change for theories of sustainable development and distributive justice. After leaving Lund, he was a Research Fellow on the AHRC-funded Global Justice and the Environment project at Birmingham University. The two projects led to a series of articles, edited volumes and a monograph: Climate Change, Justice and Future Generations (Edward Elgar: 2006). 

Ed is an active member of Warwick's Low Carbon Society Initiative (LCSI); and he has organised several international workshops and conferences in environmental politics in the past, including the ECPR Workshop Global Environmental Change and Intergenerational Justice (Helsinki University: 2007); the LCSI workshop Global Emissions Trading: Ethics, Politics and Policy (Warwick University: 2009); and a series of climate policy and ethics workshops funded by the Forum on Peace, Democracy and Justice (2009-11). He is also co-organiser of Warwick's Annual Graduate Conference in Political Theory; and a founder member of the Centre for Law, Philosophy and Public Affairs (CELPA).

Research Area(s)

My research interests cover a range of topics in moral and political philosophy; environmental politics; and the politics and ethics of global climate chang

Specific Research Interest(s)

Contemporary political philosophy (especially intergenerational and international justice); environmental ethics and politics (especially global climate change); history of political thought; Swedish politics.

In particular, I am currently engaged on research on the distributive questions raised by global climate change and its management. 

I welcome PhD proposals and research collaboration in the following areas: 

Current Research Projects

Renegotiating The Kyoto Protocol 

Global climate change raises a number of important issues for political scientists and theorists. One key issue concerns the construction of effective and equitable policies that seek to manage the threats associated with global climate change in order to protect the interests of existing and future generations. At the heart of this debate lies the status and interpretation of the 1992 United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change (UNFCCC) and the 1997 Kyoto Protocol to this Convention. This research project aims to identify and clarify the major issues and themes in contemporary climate change justice as a first step towards constructing an equitable, effective and politically feasible global climate architecture for the coming century. It addresses the appropriate aims, objectives and policy mechanisms for global climate policy - and deals with a number of challenges to the agreement of a long-term climate architecture to replace the Kyoto Protocol when it expires at the end of 2012, including the role of developing countries in any future agreement; the use of market environmental mechanisms, such as emissions trading and carbon taxes; and the appropriate balance between climate mitigation and adaptation. 

Page, E.A. (2007) 'Equity and the Kyoto Protocol', Politics, 27(1), 8-15. 

Page, E.A. (2009) 'Licenses to Kill? Cosmopolitanism, Climate Change, and Global Emissions Trading', ECPR General Conference, Potsdam University, 11 Sep 2009.

Page, E.A. (2010) 'Cashing in on Climate Change: Political Theory and Emissions Trading’, Critical Review of International Social and Political Philosophy (CRISP), forthcoming.

The Burdens Of Climate Change Justice 

How should the responsibilities of climate change justice - defined as the equitable distribution of benefits and burdens arising from global climate change - be distributed across countries and generations? This question has become a central aspect of the ongoing public debate about climate change, yet it has resisted tidy solution in the face of a number of recent philosophical accounts. At first glance, it might seem obvious that existing human beings should bear the main responsibilities since they are the only agents who can act now to prevent costly climate impacts that are still avoidable (mitigation) or adopt policies that will manage the negative impacts of impacts that are no longer avoidable (adaptation). Yet, there is a wide range of agents to which responsibilities of justice might be allocated such as individual countries, supranational organisations, national and multinational corporations, international institutions, or the developed world as a whole. This research project seeks to develop a theory of burden sharing that explains how burdens of adaptation and mitigation should be distributed between (and within) developed and developing nations. As such, the project is a part of a wider debate in contemporary political theory regarding the development of a theory of global justice that take seriously the special features of environmental issues. 

Page, E.A. (2007) 'Fairness on the Day After Tomorrow: Reciprocity, Justice and Global Climate Change', Political Studies 55:1, 225-42. 

Page, E.A. (2008) 'Distributing the Burdens of Climate Change', Environmental Politics 17(3): 556-75 (Special Issue on theme of Global Environmental Change and Intergenerational Justice).

Teaching(s)

Theories and Issues in International Political Economy

Introduction to Political Economy

First Year PhD Training Module

Suggested Fields of Inquiry

My research interests cover a range of topics in moral and political philosophy; environmental politics; and the politics and ethics of global climate change. In particular, I am currently engaged on research on the distributive questions raised by global climate change and its management. I welcome PhD proposals and research collaboration in the following areas: 

  • Distributive Justice 
    • Currencies of distributive justice (welfare, resources, capabilities, needs) 
    • The pattern of distributive justice (equality, priority, sufficiency) 
    • Global poverty and justice 
  • Intergenerational and environmental ethics 
    • The ethics of resource depletion 
    • Rights of unborn and future generations 
    • The non-identity problem 
  • Ethics and politics of global climate change 
    • The Kyoto Protocol after 2012 
    • Ethics and politics of greenhouse emissions trading 
    • Distributing the burdens of climate change mitigation and adaptation

Overview of Publications

Monograph 

Climate Change, Justice, and Future Generations (Cheltenham, Edward Elgar) 209 pages. ISBN: 1-84376-184-X (hardback: 2006) / 978-1-84720-496-7 (paperback: 2007).

Edited Volumes 

(2009) Climate Change and Intergenerational Justice, Special Issue, Intergenerational Justice Review, 9:3 (with Konrad Ott and Joeg Tremmel).

(2008) Justice, Democracy and Global Climate Change, Special Issue, Environmental Politics, 17(4) (with Ludvig Beckman).

(2003) Environmental Thought, Cheltenham: Edward Elgar. ISBN: 1 84064 409 5 (with John Proops). 

(2002) Human Security and the Environment: International Comparisons, Cheltenham: Edward Elgar. ISBN: 1 84064 458 3 (with Michael Redclift). 

Journal Articles 

(2011) ’Climatic justice and the fair distribution of atmospheric burdens’, Special Issue on ’Ethics and Climate Change’, The Monist 94(3), forthcoming.

(2011) ’Cashing in on Climate Change: Political Theory and Global Emissions Trading’, Critical Review of International Social and Political Philosophy, Special Issue on ’Climate Change and Liberal Priorities’, 14(2), in press.

(2011) ‘Cosmopolitanism, climate change and greenhouse emissions trading’, International Theory, 3(1), 37-69.

(2008) ’Three Problems of Intergenerational Justice’, Intergenerational Justice Review, 9(3), 9-12.

(2008) 'Perspectives on justice, democracy and global climate change', Environmental Politics, 17(4), 527-35 (with Ludvig Beckman).

(2008) ‘Distributing the Burdens of Climate Change’, Environmental Politics, 17(4), 556-75.

(2007) ‘Intergenerational Justice of What: Welfare, Resources or Capabilities?’, Environmental Politics, 16(3), 455-71. 

(2007) ‘Justice Between Generations: Investigating a Sufficientarian Appoach’, Journal of Global Ethics, 3(1), 3-20. 

(2007) ‘Fairness on the Day After Tomorrow: Reciprocity, Justice and Global Climate Change’, Political Studies, 55(1), 225-42.

(2007) ‘Equity and the Kyoto Protocol’, Politics, 27(1), 8-15. 

(2000) ‘Theorizing the Link Between Environmental Change and Security’, Review of European Community and International Environmental Law, 9(1), 33-43. 

(1999) ‘Intergenerational Justice and Climate Change’, Political Studies, 47(1), 53-66.

Book Chapters 

(2010) ‘Intergenerational Justice’, in Mark Bevir (ed) Encyclopedia of Political Theory (Thousand Oaks, CA: Sage).

(2005) ‘Miljöetik’ (‘Environmental Ethics’), in Sverker C. Jagers (ed) Hållbar utveckling som politik (The Politics of Sustainable Development) (Stockholm, Liber, 2005), 27-46.

(2003) ‘Environmental Security’, in Edward Page and John Proops (eds) Environmental Thought (Cheltenham, Edward Elgar, 2003), 173-190. 

(2003) ‘An Introduction to Environmental Thought’, in Edward Page and John Proops (eds) Environmental Thought (Cheltenham, Edward Elgar, 2003), 1-12 (with John Proops). 

(2002) ‘Human Security and the Environment’ in Edward Page and Michael Redclift, Human Security and the Environment (Cheltenham, Edward Elgar, 2002), 27-44. 

(2001) ‘Environmental Ethics’, ‘Quality of Life’, and ‘Prisoner’s Dilemma’, in John Barry and E. Gene Frankland (eds) The International Encyclopedia of Environmental Politics (London, Routledge, 2001). 

(1999) ‘Global Warming and the Non-Identity Problem’, in T-Chang Kim and Ross Harrison (eds) Self and Future Generations (Cambridge, White Horse Press, 1999), 107-130.